Day 3 – Bath to Ludlow

Today was a good day’s cycling. No, actually it was a GREAT day’s cycling. We started early from University of Bath’s Sports campus in an effort to miss the Bath commuter traffic. I think 800 cyclists still annoyed an awful lot of car drivers round Bath, the first climb seriously slowed everyone up and the road north of Bristol was particularly busy, very stop start for everyone and a difficult crossing of a busy main road.

We entered Wales very briefly at Chepstow for the first pit stop at Chepstow Castle. It was a great shame that the Welcome to Wales sign on the old Severn Crossing was missing. Some of the overseas visitors doing the ride must have wondered if they were welcome or even visited Wales!

We had a couple of tough climbs but we spent a lot of time riding along the Wye Valley – absolutely stunning in the sunshine. Photos to follow. After the second pitstop we had rolling roads and I eventually managed to get in a group of riders and bowled along at 18-19 mph. I ended up on the front quite a bit as I felt really strong on the bike. I hope I don’t pay for it tomorrow.

The highlights of the day:

  • Crossing the old River Severn Crossing Bridge (my first time on a bike)
  • The Wye Valley with a welcome tail wind
  • Coffee stop at Ross on Wye after 60 miles – a welcome caffeine boost
  • The group ride into Ludlow

Tomorrow sees us head to Haydock, another racecourse after Ludlow. A flat day (the flattest of the nine days) and 107 miles. Rain is forecast for the start of the day – we’ll have to see.

Day 2 – Oakhampton to Bath

Day 2 of the Deloitte Ride Across Britain saw us leave Devon and ride through Somerset to our “camp” at Bath University Sports Campus. The accommodation is probably the highlight of the whole 9 days for the riders in the Classic package as everyone gets a proper bed and ensuite facilities rather than a tent. We have all been warned to set multiple alarms to avoid sleeping in and missing the start tomorrow (from 0630 to miss the rush hour traffic).

The day itself was long at 110 miles but easier than Day 1 due to a reduction in climbing – “only” 2,581 meters!

I have several highlights:

  • Seeing my mother, brother and sister (plus my in laws and nephew Hamish) on the climb up Cheddar Gorge. They made lots of noise and supported all the riders who passed during their time waiting for me
  • Managing to get up Cothelstone Hill without stopping despite the steep gradient of around 20% in places
  • Climbing up though Cheddar Gorge – hard work but a great location for a climb (again very steep in places)
  • Having a tail wind virtually all the way with the sun coming out from mid morning

I wore my Dementia UK jersey today so hopefully I’ll have a few good photos to share in due course.

Tomorrow we venture into Wales, crossing the old Severn Bridge to Chepstow and up the Wye Valley though Leominster to Ludlow Race Course for the night. A ” short” day of 100 miles!

I’m raising money to support Dementia UK and their work to help families dealing with dementia. You can sponsor me by visiting my Virgin Money Giving page here

Day 1 – Land’s End to Oakhampton

The big story of the day was a nasty slow speed slide on a descent covered with a thin film of mud from Truro, resulting lots of skin lost from my right thigh and some superficial grazes on my arm. The bike is fine, just a few scuff marks on the handle bar tape. I think I got off likely as there was a broken wrist within two miles of the start and a fractured hip. I can’t post photos of the injury as they may upset the reader!

The ride itself was great, sticking mainly to small country lanes. Just what I’m used to in Vale of Glamorgan although I think it was a bit of a shock to the system for some other cyclists! This is the hardest day in terms of climbing elevation. No big name climbs but lots of little, quite sharp inclines followed by tricky descents. No real time to “recover” and it was a case of taking it relatively easy, although I still managed to ride at an average of 15 mph over the 105 miles.

We saw some great scenery and also rode passed St Michael’s Mount (photos to follow when I get some decent internet access!).

St Michael’s Mount

Tonight is going to be interesting trying to sleep with a great big plaster on my leg. However, I hope I will get to sleep considering the lack of sleep last night – too excited! The same was true for everyone else staying in the hotel. I’m so glad I paid for the Plus package rather than staying in a tent!

Tomorrow we have Cheddar Gorge on the ride into Bath. Another “big day” in terms of distance and climbing required. Hopefully the pain killers will do their job and help me get though the day.

I’m looking forward to seeing my mother, brother and sister (plus my sister in law and brother in law) who are travelling down to cheer me on up Cheddar Gorge and, if I cycle fast enough, see me in Bath base camp before they need to get back home.

Four Days to the Start ….

There are now four days until I start the Deloitte Ride Across Britain from Land’s End to John O’Groats, a ride of 982 miles over nine days, with just under 52,000 feet of climbing (I think I’ll have to find the extra 18 miles somewhere to take it up to 1,000 miles!).  The ride will take me from the the most westerly point in Great Britain to the most northerly point (on the mainland), travelling through three countries and 23 counties.     Here is the the whole route (thank you Threshold Sports for the reproduction permission) and a link to a short promotional video (again “Thank you” to Threshold Sports) for the ride here  (turn the sound down if you are looking at the video in an office!). It’s too late to enter now but there’s always 2019, the tenth anniversary year of the ride!Whole_Route-01.jpg

The first two days are meant to be the toughest as they involve a high cumulative effort of climbing between them.  Day 1 involves over 8,200 feet of climbing which is the highest daily total of the whole nine days, closely followed by 6,850 feet on Day 2.  Only Day 7 in Scotland gets close to Day 1 with 7,333 feet of climbing going up to the Glenshee Ski Station and it isn’t even the longest day – it happens to be Day 8 with the infamous “The Lecht” climb which, based on the ride Facebook page comments, is giving lots of the Deloitte Ride Across Britain participants the collywobbles!

I’m looking forward to the days riding in Scotland, particularly if we get some dry weather and we are able to take in the scenery.  I’m slightly worried about the midges – at least they will encourage no hanging around!

I now have one more indoor training session to go on Wednesday which will bring to the end over ten months of  specific training for the ride.  In some respects I can’t wait to start the ride.  There is a mixture of excitement and trepidation at what lies ahead; have I done enough training? can I keep going over nine days? how will I cope if there is lots of heavy rain?  On the other hand, as I said in my previous post, I don’t think I could have done much more to prepare physically for the ride.  I’m pretty sure I will be OK – I will not be the quickest (it’s not a race after all) and I shouldn’t be last either!

The bike is all clean and packed up ready for its collection on Thursday morning.  I’ve got all my gear together and just need to pack a last few items after triple checking the suggested kit list against what’s gone into the bag!  Another recurring theme of the event is the weight limit on the bags.  I decided to de-stress by paying for some extra weight allowance – much better for the overall health and wellbeing !  I can also take a few energy bars that I’ve been using for training – a different brand from one of the ride sponsors.

I’m going to try and continue this blog after each day of the ride.  The length and quality of the writing may depend on the energy levels each day – there could be a very short entry after a very bad day …

On the sponsorship front I’m very close to my new target of £4,000 in support of Dementia UK and there is still time to sponsor me to increase the total further.  Do contact Dementia UK on their support line if you need advice or support for a loved one with dementia.

If you would like to sponsor me, you can reach my Virgin Money Giving page here  It is very quick and easy to donate and every donation, however large or small, is greatly appreciated.  Go on, click on the link !

Final week of training before the Ride

I am now entering the final week of training before starting the Deloitte Ride Across Britain on 8 September.  This weekend saw me do two rides of over 5 hours, although not on consecutive days as originally planned due to the appalling weather on Sunday.  I know some of my fellow Deloitte RAB participants did brave the wind and rain – good for them.  I chose the indoor option to avoid catching a head cold or even worse crashing the bike!

My ride on Saturday was meant to be “flat/rolling” and I still managed 1,931 m of climbing in about 86 miles of riding.  The ride today was “three climbs” and I did 2,134m of climbing in 88 miles of riding but in a longer time, probably due to the length of the climbs.

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Top of the Rhigos climb

The ride today can be seen on on Relive map here – lots of hairpins on the climbs and descents!  The benefits of living in South Wales.  I was lucky with the weather as there were a few spots of rain but I managed to miss all but one heavy rain shower.  The rain did make some of the early descents a bit tricky and I certainly picked up more speed later on in the ride when the road dried out.

On the Saturday ride, I revisited some of my training loops round the Vale of Glamorgan and here is the latest “season” photo from Merthyr Mawr img_0742.jpg– all the rain in the last week has raised the river levels considerably since mid July when there was just a trickle.  It is also amazing how much a little rain changes the grass from yellow to green!

The end of the serious training has also enabled me to take stock of how far I have come since I started training seriously for the ride last November.  The biggest change is the weight loss, down from 94 kg (perhaps even more) to 85kg (13.5 stone in “old money”, a loss of around 1.5 stone).  I’m sure the weight loss would have been greater if I’d been more disciplined with the diet, however, I’m now the lightest I’ve been since starting work in Cardiff 15 years ago.  It has made a huge difference to the speed at which I go up the hills!

My fitness levels have also improved dramatically.  The Training Peaks fitness level has increased from 60 to 108, my Functional Threshold Power (a test used by cyclists to measure their power output) has increased from 239  to 261 watts and my resting heart rate is now in the low 40s.  I don’t think there is much more I could do to prepare physically for the challenge ahead.  I have to thank my coach, Lawrence Cronk at Enduraprep, for the training plans and pushing me on in the training.

I think the most difficult part will be the mental side of getting up shortly after 5am each day and start cycling 110 miles a day for 9 consecutive days to complete the 980 mile distance from Land’s End to John O’Groats.  I’m sure once I’ve got over the initial 10 miles I’ll be fine – this was the case today when there was a lot of procrastination before setting out.  The thought of everyone who has very kindly sponsored me to support the work of Dementia UK will give me all the motivation I need – I will not want to let you down!

If you would like to sponsor me and raise money for Dementia UK you can reach my Virgin Money Giving page here Please do tick the Gift Aid box if you are eligible as the tax man will increase your donation by 25%.  Please also remember that Virgin Money only charge a 2% fee compared to the 5% charged by a well know competitor!  There’s still time to donate!

Two weeks to go!

The start of the Deloitte Ride Across Britain became very real this morning when I received my rider number in the post.  I am rider number 23 !  I can’t think of anything witty linked to the number 23 except it was my age when I started work as a trainee solicitor…far too long ago.

I also decided to get most of my kit together by going through the official Threshold Sports kit list.  Here is most of the kit

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All the kit – some idea !

– there are a few items missing, like flip flops, waterproof trousers, a warm jacket for use in the camp, sleeping bag, blow up pillow and sleeping mat (for the one night when I have to camp in the middle of Scotland).  It looks like I have everything and there will be no need to visit bike shops or outdoors shops for last minute additions.

It all seems a big bundle of stuff and you may wonder why I need everything?  Well, I am riding 980 miles in nine days and we have two laundry runs after three and six days.  However, the laundry is limited to six items of clothing which means three jerseys and three bib shorts.  For the benefit of the non-cyclists reading this blog, bib shorts are cycling shorts with sort of built in braces which are much more comfortable to wear than shorts with a waist-band.  I also have to be ready for whatever weather we encounter when cycling the length of Great Britain – it did rain on eight of the nine days in 2017!

If you can’t identify what is what in the photo above here are the the items broken down into different collections (I think I must have been doing far too much online shopping to come up with that phrase).

First we have the cycling jerseys, three short sleeved (hopefully sunny weather) and one long sleeved.

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The jerseys!

It was easy to pick two tops – the Dementia UK top and the Deloitte Ride Across Britain top.  The third top was more difficult – in the end I chose the Dragon Ride top as a nod to where I live and work in Wales – it is also a great design!  The long sleeved jersey was chosen because it is a bright colour and very light weight!

We also have a selection of wet weather gear including the cycling jackets, one for rain, a wind top and a gillet for early morning starts when I don’t think (or hope there will be any rain).  All the jackets are from Rapha and I’ve had them for a while so I know that they work – expensive but worth it.

I also have over-socks and over-shoes to try and keep the cycling shoes dry when it rains.  In reality, the over-socks and over-shoes merely delay the inevitable of wet feet as the water just runs down the legs and into the shoes – I don’t fancy resorting to duck tape round the top of the socks (and I’m not shaving my legs!).  Other items of clothing for keeping warm include base layers (short sleeved and long sleeved), mainly made with Merino wool which keeps me warm even when it gets wet, and arm and leg warmers from Castelli which are meant to shed light rain showers.

The final photos include my cycling helmet (compulsory), various gloves, cycling glasses,  hats and a neck warmer.

There is also a collect of what I call “Bits and Pieces” including some lights, a spare tyre, a few tools, equipment charger, Garmin cycling computer to record the ride, sun cream, midge repellent and the all important Chamois cream to ensure a reduction in friction between the bits shorts and my backside!  I’ve also included a portable ultrasound machine which could be useful if I have a strained muscle during the ride.

We now have a Bank Holiday weekend coming up and it will be my last really long rides (of about five hours) before the start of the Deloitte Ride Across Britain.  The forecast is for dry weather on Saturday and Monday – Sunday looks like a complete wash out with rain and strong winds (I will not be taking any risks going out cycling on Sunday).

There is still time to sponsor me to help support the work of Dementia UK so that families can access advice and support to care for loved ones with dementia, like my father.  Have a read of my post  Why am I supporting Dementia UK in the Deloitte Ride Across Britain ? John Evans (1934 – 2010) to see why I am putting myself through the ride to raise money for Dementia UK.  You can reach my Virgin Money Giving page here

Wye Valley Warrior report

Last Sunday saw me take part in the Wye Valley Warrior sportive organised by UK Cycling Events.

When I went to bed on the Saturday night the rain was lashing down and I seriously considered switching off the alarm and not bothering with the ride. Fortunately good sense kicked in and the alarm went off at 6 am which always makes me think of the Robin Williams line from Good Morning Vietnam “What does 0600 stand for- ‘ Oh my God it’s early’!”

Back to the weather – it was still raining. After a quick wash and breakfast (double porridge) it was in to the car for the drive to Chepstow racecourse (bike packed in the car the night before). After registering, changing into cycling shoes and wet weather gear it was off at 8 am.

The ride was over new routes for me. Raining, windy, slippery roads – basically all pretty horrible. The good news was that I had attached clip on mudguards to the bike which kept the worst of the spray off me – no wet backside – a result.

The 92 miles was tough with over 7,000 feet of climbing. Yes the rain did stop, to be replaced by mist and drizzle. The wind kept up which was energy sapping on the flat into headwinds. There was also a long climb at 80 miles and a short sharp climb at 86 miles when I was very grateful for a 34 tooth rear cassette to just keep moving! Unfortunately the conditions weren’t conducive for taking any photos of the scenery – sorry!  To make up for it here is a photo of the bike I’ll be using on the big ride taken in my mother’s garden just over a week ago.

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Trek Domane for the big ride

I was glad to finish in under 6 hours 30 minutes. Unfortunately, I got back to find a flat tyre on the car – that’s another story!  This week has a couple of light recovery rides before a few longer rides at the weekend. A massage at Agile Therapy on Monday evening certainly helped ease the muscles and is really recommended.

There is now less than four weeks to go before the start of the Deloitte Ride Across Britain, so it’s starting to get serious with checking the kit list and buying the final bits and pieces that I don’t already have.  At some point I’ll have a practise pack to make sure I’ve got everything and it all fits in the kit bag.

I have increased my target for my Dementia UK fundraising to £4,000, having smashed my initial £3,000 target, and hopefully I’ll be able to achieve this target. You can reach my Virgin Money Giving page here if you would like to sponsor me and help the great work carried on by Dementia UK